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points, that is the biggest loss percentage wise of all the indices. in the energy pits, by the way, natural gas, take a look at what happened. contrasting with oil, natural gas getting a big pop almost 5% pop today. lots of news of what this administration might be able to accept, they may not be negative on. awaiting earnings because the wide reach seen as an economic dull weather for the country and certainly tech stocks in particular. no progress, ballooning deficits, that is what european leaders are facing across the pond but also the situation we're facing right here at home. watch out, the u.s. could become the next grease. plus we're going back to the global leadership conference where she is surrounded by all kinds of business leaders. what do you have coming up? >> we were surrounded when richard branson was here. they scattered, they all went to go listen to what is of ccurse one of the most exciting and innovative entrepreneurs on the planet. coming up, another one, this time jimmy wale of wikipedia, the cofounder. you and i haven't spoken to him in the past. boy is he
of this event which were very grateful for, and i think it's symbolic of incredible new energy that is developing in detroit and i should also say that josh created a company called, in 1999 here in detroit, operating all this time. two weeks ago it sold for a nice exit. here's a story of a company, a local copy that came from here, when all the way and he's an real well with the. even vested in a ton of other companies. so i just want to start asking you, steve, you know, when i told you about this you like it neatly, you want to be a part of the trick why do you think techonomy detroit was a good idea? >> i didn't think it was good at that is a great idea. i appreciate that you're willing to do this and shine a spotlight on detroit because to me it is not just about detroit commission of the story of aqaba notion in america and how it really is spread more broadly through the nation than we sometimes relate. silicon valley is the epicenter of enormous innovation, tremendous companies there, exciting, something we're all proud of. but there's also a lot of companies all across
on the cutting edge of innovation and clean energy and to reduce our deficits and balance it in a responsible way. this is important because at the end of this year we face a deadline that requires us to make decisions about how to pay down our deficit, decisions that will impact the economy and the middle-class now and in the future. last year, i work with democrats and republicans to cut a trillion dollars worth of spending. i will work with both to do more. we cannot just cut our way to prosperity. if we are serious about reducing the deficit, we have to combine spending cuts with revenues. that means asking the wealthiest americans to pay more in taxes. that is the only way we can afford to invest in education and job training and manufacturing, the ingredients of a strong upper class and economy. i have put a plan to allow us to make these investments and reduce our deficit by $4 trillion of the next decade. i hope to compromise for new ideas but i refuse to accept any approach that is not balanced. i will not ask students, seniors, more middle-class families to pay down the deficit while pe
-- prince of earmarks and a reformed non- earmarker will stay, and where health care and energy policy, a committee of jurisdiction there, that chairman will be staying another two years. ways and means, which might see a lot of action with fiscal cliff and tax reform, entitlement stuff, always goes through ways and means -- dave camp, like fred upton. judiciary committee, he will make a bid for the science committee. he will find himself in competition with james sensenbrenner, who indicated he is interested in that job as well. ralph hall, the chairman now, term limits. transportation and infrastructure headed by john mica, he is term-limited in that role, and there are a few people will have seniority and the either have committee assignments or are not looked upon as viable. it looks like we are passing the baton to a new generation. bill schuster, the son of bud shuster, old transportation committee chairman, he is making a very strong play for the chairmanship of that. that will be just in time for congress to start thinking about another reauthorization of transportation program
. the extra money goes to energy efficiency and alternative energy projects. yes, proper 40. the new state district boundaries are approved. >>jacqueline: we are looking at a 70 degrees of reading recently in antioch. now, temperatures are in the 60s and 50s along the coast. 60s for oakland in 60s in the south-bay. as we go for the overnight hours we're going to continue to see the cooler conditions. and also that will be tracking to the bay iraq with increasing cloud coverage but that is not the system that is going to be bringing the spring for the bay--area. >> that could be lingering for the next couple of days. >>pam: a developing story this nor'easter is slammed the east coast. they are this nor'e[ laughter ]mmed [ girl ] wow. you guys have it easy. i wish i had u-verse when i was your age. in my day, we didn't have these fancy wireless receivers. blah, blah, blah. if i had a sleepover, i couldn't just move the tv into the playroom. no, we had to watch movies in the den because that's where the tv outlet was. and if dad was snoring on the couch, we muscled through it. is she for real
the consequences, maybe we can find a basis for acting. on the rubric of energy, there's a lot that obama wants to do on energy -- natural gas, etc., addressing climate change in the process -- it may be pragmatic in the context of this crisis and there may be movement. >> this question is for matt. as we see the latino population getting bigger, more affluent, more politically involved, and also the culturally based, normally socially conservative family, opening the gates up for everyone as long as they have equal opportunity -- if there is a legitimate latino candidate in the future, the reciprocal, will they be able to coalesce with the african- american vote just as president obama has taken the coalition of both latinos and african- americans -- would a hispanic be able to do the same thing? >> there is a lot of similarities. when you look at congressional candidates that are out there that represent black and latino , they are doing that our reach, and there are similarities. we sometimes see disagreements in primaries, but in general, there is usually overwhelming support, and we're sta
but continuing with the theme of abundance, we will see the development of an energy surplus because of technological advances in exploiting both oil and natural gas resources, combined with new energy efficiency measures that will greatly reduce u.s. energy use. now the u.s. is now predicted, the international energy agency, predicts the u.s. will be the, will be the number one producer of oil by 2020. it will also be probably close to the top in the producers of natural gas. this will give us the wealth and income, mike lindh mentioned -- lind, mentioned 1 1/2% of gdp, we have 16 to 20 years to make up for the short fall in, in social security and 4 to 5% in medicare. well, the explosion of a moving from a energy deficit to a energy surplus will more than half close that gdp gap. so, we have a economic conditions that suggest that the challenges we face are the exact opposite of what the bowles-simpson grand bargain would impose on us as a growth strategy. the conditions that we're going to face over the next five to eight years with some amelioration if we do the right things are
, energy, education. a whole host of issues he is focused on. that you heard him talk about during the entire campaign. >> he's been one of the unsung heroes. i think his vice presidential debate was fantastic. he has given the president a yin/yang. he must be feeling pretty proud, isn't he? >> well, i think he is. i am. he played think important role in this campaign. the vice presidential debate came at a time when there was a bit of a slide, if you look at some of the polls. and, you know, he stopped that. i was very proud of him in that debate. i was very proud of him what he did throughout the country over the last six, eight months. he was in the battleground state of ohio dozens of times, all over the battleground states and spoke directly to the middle class about what this president has done and what this president will do to continue to build this economy from the middle out and the bottom up. i don't think there's a better spokesperson on behalf of the president and the party and with what the administration wants to do over the next four years, my father, i was extremel
. -- economies. and what are really the economic engines of our region. to say he is sacrificing us for a energy policy that is politically expedient. and i hope he will keep his promise that he focuses on sustainable energy and abandon his support for -- our realtor is shutting down. we have barry farms here shut -- we have dairy farms here shut down since 2007. -- dairy farms since 2007. that is america's bread and butter literally. i hope he will respect the rural culture. host: alex tweets -- host: one other tweet this morning from brian -- host: brought up this morning that latino voters are urging obama to focus on immigration. here is a story from "the new york times." host: "in the sense of urgency from mr. boehner." we will focus more on that issue and issues facing latino voters later on in today's "washington journal." we will go to the democrat line. ida from longwood, florida. what is the most import issue for you in the second term? caller: the most apparent issue that the news wanted to think is the fiscal cliff. it is interesting the word fiscal cliff is a cliche for "how much mo
. if you look at what is happening in the iranian energy area, it is not only the fact they are able to sell less than 50% of what they were selling before, it is their production and output is down from over 4 million barrels a day to 2.6 million barrels a day. part of that is because of the sanctions, the inability to continue to toin their energy infrastructure. the inability to pump and a store oil as they should down oil fields, they may not be as easy to recoup. you look at what is happening to the currency, the devaluation. there is a -- there are some estimates that the currency is devaluated every two months. that means when you go buy something, it costs you twice as much. you have in the bank is worth half as much. is not to have an effect on the society as a whole. but that with the supreme leader has been saying for the past couple of weeks. -- look at what the supreme leader has been sitting for the past couple of weeks. he has been calling for officials to stop fighting each other. when the head of the revolutionary guard is criticizing the head of the bank for the cur
and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. ♪ atmix of energies.ve the world needs a broader that's why we're supplying natural gas to generate cleaner electricity... that has around 50% fewer co2 emissions than coal. and it's also why, with our partner in brazil, shell is producing ethanol - a biofuel made from renewable sugarcane. >>a minute, mom! let's broaden the world's energy mix. let's go. >>> now that the election has passed and we're hoping that president obama hosas gotten a good night's sleep and time to hang out with the girls and tussle with beau. he'll need the r and r before he tackles the agenda. first thing i do, i try to clean out the work space and from what we hear, the west wing is going to get a deep cleaning. some of the top brass will be taking their leave to make way tore fresh legs to take them through the second half. among the starters, treasury secretary, timothy geithner, secretary of state hillary clinton. leon panetta. energy secretary, steven chu, ken salazar and epa administrator lisa jackson. that's just the first string. let's see
's that? roads, bridges, green energy, efficient buildings. you know, after a decade of bloodshed and combat abroad, americans re-elected a president who ended one war and is going to end another one. america voted for social change, for the first time in the nation's history, voters approved marriage equality measures. they did it in not just one state, but three states. and in minnesota, voters rejected a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. voters across the country are in line with the president of the united states when it comes to these equal rights. these equal rights. >> for me, personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. >> so in the end, voters chose to move forward, not to go back to the failures of the past. on a number of different issues. it was a message that president obama understood very well last night. >> i believe we can seize this future together, because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we're not as cynical as the pundits believe. we are greater than the su
in a pot of time and energy and talent was spent on this campaign. there is voters across america that took as much as six hours to stand in line to vote. the same house majority leader. so what is that going to mean as it moves forward here in washington? >> i'm going to go back again. as i ended, the fact we have the same majority leader, senate, and i'm very glad we do. harry reid is a great leader. the fact he's still the majority leader doesn't mean there hasn't been a change. there has in fact been a significant change in the makeup of who people are as about their life experience. it's about what they bring to the table. the fact is in the state of new hampshire, for example, we have a woman governor, two women senators, when democrat and one republican and we now have two women democratic numbers of congress. they are in many ways. we also know they shall not pass the first vote and maybe they're going to be a pioneer in this kind of representation. i'm going to go back for a moment, by the way, jennifer. after thinking about this from i realized when i hear maggie hasan talk out wh
and the truth is, they are brutal. you look what is happening in the iranian energy area, not only the fact that they're able to sell, you know, less than 50% of what they were selling before. it is that their production, their output is down from over 4 million barrels a day to 2.6 million barrels a day. part of the reason for that is precisely because of the sanctions, the inability to continue to invest in the energy infrastructure, the inability to continue to pump and store oil as they shut down oil fields that may not be so easy for them to recoup. you look what is happening to the currency, the devaluation. there are some estimates that the currency is being devalued by half every two months. think about what that means. it means that what you're buying, when you go and you buy something it costs you twice as much. it means what you have in the bank is worth half as much. if this is continuing to happen, it is bound to have an effect on the society as a whole whole. look at what the supreme leader has been saying over the last couple weeks. on more than one occasion he has explicitly
nonearmarker now is staying put at the appropriations level. fred upton, who's the chairman of the energy and commerce committee where a lot of health care and a lot of energy policy goes through, the committee of jurisdiction there, is going to be staying for another two years. and ways and means, which might see a lot of action with fiscal cliff, with tax reform, any kind of entitlement stuff also goes thruways and means, dave camp, another michigander is not going anywhere either. the judiciary committee which is headed by lamar smith right now, he's term limited, he's going to make a bid for the science committee. and he will find himself in competition with james sensenbrenner who has indicated he is interest inside that job as well. ralph hall, who's the republican -- who's the chairman now is term limited. also the transportation and infrastructure committee which is now headed by john mica, and mica is term limited in that role, and there are a few people who have seniority, but they either have committee assignments or are not looked upon as viable. it looks as though we are pass
outlined are energy reform and education reform. now, given the realities of the political situation in washington, education reform seems to be more likely to get bipartisan cooperation. but the president can do quite a bit using his executive authority to achieve some changes in energy policy on his own. you mentioned a foreign trip that is right. the president and the white house have announced he will be going in about ten days overseas. he will visit cambodia and thailand and myanmar where he will visit with the now freed leader aun san su kyi. >> he had a phone call yesterday with the republican leadership with john boehner, the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell. is he planning on sitting down with those two republican leaders any time soon? is the white house saying? >> reporter: there's nothing announced for a leaders meeting so far. but i am certain, wolf, that that will be coming because there's such important negotiations ahead. i'm told that the president's conversation with speaker boehner was courteous, it was brief. and i'm told that they also discussed the impo
with the fire wall strategy spending about half of the convention dollars in energy. the three fire walls deutsch of florida, ohio and virginia which aside from indiana and north carolina is more appointed to victories of 2008 were the lowest percentage stays for barack obama. they have to those states together have 60 electoral votes they would appear to have to be entered 32 electoral votes without them he would have 272 which would meet only one other state would have tipped. there is not a likely candidate as you look down the percentages in this election. but it was nonetheless close. and i think it is this proved to be effective if you carry committees currently carrying florida by 46,000 votes and by 107,000 virginia by 100,000. the two injured 53,000 votes margins are responsible for his big electoral vote margin. it is a classic example of a high-risk strategy. the obama strategist are now going to be healed with some appropriateness as berlin and for employing the strategy. if a few numbers turn out a little differently they might be excoriated, but the fact is that they succeed
candidates talk about making us more energy independent. there are a lot of things we can do that might lead to compromise. two things have been done by the administration. the cap a standards, when fully implemented, will reduce the need for importing oil. the greenhouse gas standards have changed the way power plants have the function. that, plus the green market force of the decline of natural gas prices, has led to a lot of change. senator portman has spent a lot of time on energy efficiency for buildings. the state that has the lowest per-capita consumption of energy when it comes to non- transportation, you will never guess. california, who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> exactly. why? california's per capita consumption -- 44% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings, whether residential, commercial. 35% is transportation. california, in 1978, passed building standards under then- governor brown, who was known for this, governor moonbeam. every building had to pass energy standards to make california very efficient. these are the kind of thin
.s. manufacturing driven by very low energy prices. we're self-sufficient energy for the first time in years. another company like ppg, they really own the coatings business, about 70% of revenues from coatings, they're growing 4% to 6% organically and end the year with $2.5 billion in cash. they just sold their business, another $1 billion, that $3.5 billion in cash, 60% go to grow the business, 40% return to shareholders. you've got 5%, 6% top line, 10%, 12% net income growth with stock buy back and dividend going up 15% a year. you get 2% while you wait. if things -- if we don't do it on a fiscal cliff and things get worse, not going to get hurt. >> where did you buy comcast? >> comcast we've owned for a couple of years. that's another one that has morphed into a return of capital story. when we bought it just superior business model in a tough environment. if things get better, great, employment improves, we're going to have more hook-ups, housing improves, more connections, great growth story. if things don't get better, we're trying to protect for the downside and keep that optionalty
women in the senate, things may get done. you also have a lot of energy of new senators. there is a big scramble up there. my overriding role is that if you are thinking about the fiscal cliff right now, what you are in the white house or you are the mitch mcconnell, you have to consider that voters in exit polls are saying that they're willing to take higher taxes, but they think government is too big. it is there. it is within reach. but john boehner has to be given some kind of cover so he can bring 140 republican votes with him. it will be very difficult to do a. obama will have to immediately decide whether he wants to go off the cliff with the bush tax cuts, or if he will try to get something big and mushy like tax reform. it will have to be massaged in such a way through increased revenue and more money flow and fees. anything to avoid that horrible thing called a tax increase. >> we heard the last panel talked a little bit about redistricting and the impact on partisanship, especially in the house. the senate has gotten more ideological itself after last night. the democrats com
the time. they want to move on to cleaner fights on energy reform or other things and have this off of the deck. >> okay. chris, let me bring you in. you heard a.b. say that grover norquist, who is not an elected leader surmised there's no mandate. the vice president actually on a ballot, here's what he believes came down on tuesday. he said in part, there was a clear sort of mandate about people coming much closer to our view about how to deal with tax policy. i just think he it's going to take time for the republicans to sort of digest what the consequences are for them internally. what's your reaction to at least biden believing there was a mandate for their tax policy? it shows in our exit polling that a significant number of people were okay with a tax increase for people who make over $250,000. >> my perspective is elections have consequences, and to the winner there is a certainly significance that follows from it. when you look at the exit polls in particular with the one you just referenced, 60% of the voters sided with the president's position on raising taxes on those mak
for a energy policy that is politically expedient. i hope he will keep his promise that he focuses on sustainable energy and abandon his support for -- our realtor is shutting down. we have barry farms here shut down since 2007. -- dairy farms since 2007. that is america's bread and butter literally. host: alex tweets -- one other tweet this morning from brian -- brought up this morning that latino voters are urging obama to focus on immigration. here is a story from "the new york times." we will focus more on that issue and issues facing latino "ters later on in today's washington journal." we will go to the democrat line. what is the most import issue for you in the second term? caller: the most apparent issue that the news wanted to think is the fiscal cliff. it is interesting the word fiscal cliff is a cliche for "how much money is going to be taken out of the $150 million ira's of mr. romney." understand that the fiscal cliff was imposed by bush to keep the tax benefits for the rich in place. in a compromise, obama continued those for another year. in 2008 there were supposed
looking frontal system to the north and west. most of the energy will stay to the north. tomorrow at least we will look for clouds and as the high builds in, it will bring warmer temperatures. i will show you the forecast animation. monday remember the rain line stays to the north. as we head into tuesday, this is tuesday, by 10:00 a.m., it starts to sag a little bit to the south. i put a chance of scattered showers in the north bay for tuesday and thin -- and then we take them out for wednesday. all of this will move back to the north. so wednesday looks like the best day. this workweek will have dry conditions and temperatures warming into the 60s. as we head into thursday night and friday, another wave of moisture will move in and we will see some showers. here is a look at your highs for tomorrow. 60s across the bay area. 63 in santa rosa and san francisco 60, 64 for oakland as well as livermore. 64 for san jose. a little more sunshine the further south you go. santa cruz 65. 65 for gilroy. my accu-weather seven-day forecast, north bay chance of showers on tuesday. we are all dry and m
frontal system to the north and west. most of the energy will stay to the north. tomorrow at least we will look for clouds and as the high builds in, it will bring warmer temperatures. i will show you the forecast animation. monday remember the rain line stays to the north. as we head into tuesday, this is tuesday, by 10:00 a.m., it starts to sag a little bit to the south. i put a chance of scattered showers in the north bay for tuesday and thin -- and then we take them out for wednesday. all of this will move back to the north. so wednesday looks like the best day. this workweek will have dry conditions and temperatures warming into the 60s. as we head into thursday night and friday, another wave of moisture will move in and we will see some showers. here is a look at your highs for tomorrow. 60s across the bay area. 63 in santa rosa and san francisco 60, 64 for oakland as well as livermore. 64 for san jose. a little more sunshine the further south you go. santa cruz 65. 65 for gilroy. my accu-weather seven-day forecast, north bay chance of showers on tuesday. we are all dry and mild
to the downside this morning. we have been familiar with a lot of investigations to the safety of the energy drinks. monster holds strong saying there are no issues with their drinks. there have been hard attacks and questions. they came with numbers smaller than expected profit and spending on promotional spending so we are seeing stock with a down arrow. stuart: republicans and democrats on capitol hill are working on ways to avoid the fiscal cliff and they disagree about it but i am inclined to that tax hikes are coming our way and soon. sofer's to david. you agree with that. dave: not entirely. this is the simpson-bowles report brought out five democratic senators voted in favor of this. this lowers tax rates to a top rate 23%. if you keep -- and keep some deductions. alan simpson co-author of this report says you don't have to raise taxes. go into this tax code where there are $1 trillion of tax expenditures and tax year marks and pull the babies out. stuart: i got it. do you really think a president who has just the quick reelection and the leader of the senate who has just said we are
? caller: i think jobs. included in that will be energy, moving forward on a lot of different fronts. renewable energy to some -- also feels if they can be done responsibly. health care can yield many jobs. i think obamacare will be good. i think all of these will really energize jobs. it will be a positive thing for the american people. host: we will move onto native who is a republican in florida. caller:my name is nat. i crossed the aisle to the democratic side. the reason for it is because i believe the president of's agenda is on a positive role. it takes time to correct the course of this country. by the time his actions of three years ago catches up, it will probably be his sixth year in office. then you will probably start seeing the yield of all of the effort he put an two or three years ago. some of us really want to be able to eat that big bird. i think we woke up in the morning and realize some people are going to have to realize how to season their crow and enjoy eating at. if we do not continue to stay on the president's course, we will find our difficulties will not an
the energy and enthusiasm that helped republicans win house in 2010 and i think many of those same house members elected in 2010 will be the primary obstacle to a deal on the fiscal cliff. those words have not been mentioned but i think people will be asking about and that will be the focus going forward. those tea party members or whatever they call themselves are still there and they are still a conservative and holding the same views. >> don't forget, senate leadership elections will be interesting on the republican side. the election of ted crews and what he and that doing push in that caucus to the right, the strength of rand paul. republican senators don't have a lot of ability to stop what's happening in the senate. >> that's right. the other tea party-aligned incoming senator from nebraska -- most people have paid attention to the ones who lost because of their comment about rape. they did not do badly. but only 10 or 11, if alan west loses his recount. but only 10 members of the class were defeated the mets on a bad ratio. >> there was so much concern going into this alexian abo
tax reform. we could have energy legislation. we haven't even had a defense bill or appropriations bill or cybersecurity. joe lieberman is still trying to get the cybersecurity bill which is really important for this country. really dangerous. but the president, he is our leader. he needs to engage more. we got somebody here in the room that can talk to him. i'm incurable optimist. i think he may do it. >> well, i think it's got to start in this lame-duck session that begins tomorrow. we can't adopt a total bipartisan balanceed budget agreement but we can get -- balanced budget agreement but we can get started. we can have a down payment at least to cover the first year of what otherwise would be the sequester which is $110 billion, and i think we got to prove we can do some tax reform and we can do some entitlement reform and pull it together. and then adopt a process that tries again to push the committees -- according to the regular order -- to come out with enough savings and spending, enough new revenue as part of tax reform and most critically long-term entitlement reform. t
this is incredibly tiring. but you know what, you drive energy from the good work that so many people do around this commonwealth. i could not be so from -- more fortunate in the friends and supporters i have had in 15 years. i'm going to add lib one more thank you, i want to think people who waited for hours and hours -- thank people who waited for hours and hours. [applause] i am not sure, i am not sure people should have had to wait for hours and hours to vote. when i was a youngster, i took a year off from moscow and worked as a missionary in honduras. -- law school and worked as a missionary in honduras. nobody could vote for anything. nobody could vote for anything. i took it for granted, of course people vote. that is what we do. when you live somewhere else where people cannot vote and they cannot pick their leaders and a lot of people in the world still living countries and societies like that, you come to realize how important it is. the specter of virginians standing for hours and hours in mind today, maybe they should not have had to, but they were willing to do it. [applause] parti
, frankly, the time and energy to devote to trying to catch up. they thought they could lock down this primary nomination by the end of january or early february and what end up happening is they played the sort of extended game of whack-a-mole where a different candidate came up every month and it wasn't until the end of april that they secured the nomination and at that point the romney campaign was pretty much broke. his image was battered by the nominating battle where he lurched to the right on a number of issues and he was in a bad position to take on the obama machine. they began to try to assemble a ground game and started raising money but even up until the end of the election this month, they didn't catch up displood in just a ver little timee have left, carol leigh what, would you say the obama folks said made the difference? the front-end spending that allowed them to soften romney up ahead of going into the republican convention, and they caught some breaks, too. if you remember, romney's 47% tape came right after the moment and underscored-- the argument they were ma
the department of energy or the department of education or housing at the federal level. we are not going to spend $2 trillion on the military that the military does not want. we are not scaling back on student loans, because the country's new plan is that you should borrow money from their parents. we are not vetoing the dream act. we are not self-deporting. we are not letting detroit go bankrupt. we are not starting a trade war with china on inauguration day in january. we are not going to have, as a president, a man who once led a mob of friends to run down a scared, gay kid, to hold him down and forcibly cut his hair off with a pair of scissors while that kid cried and screamed for help and there was no apology, not ever. we are not going to have a secretary of state, john bolton. we are not bringing dick cheney back. we are not going to have a foreign policy shop stocked with architects of the iraq war. we are not going to do it. we had the chance to do that if we wanted to do that, as a country. and we said no, last night, loudly. now, to be fair. if you are a conservative or if you
's important as well as moving ahead with some of these other things. comprehensive energy policy, things we really need to do because there's been too much time wasted on hearings that don't matter and people trying to do sound bites, as great as they are on your show, i think people want to see people willing to work together, and i really heard it in our state. >> would you like to be president? >> i love being the senator from minnesota. that's way want to do. we have a great state. you should come and visit land of 10,000 lakes. you'd have all kind of water to walk on. >> was that yes or no? >> that was a no. i couldn't be clearer. i love being the senator from minnesota. that's my job. >> others are talking about it. anyway, thank you. congratulations, senator klobuchar of minnesota. a great state which i know a bit about. thank you. >>> let's go now to amy sullivan of the new republic. amy is in your column in these -- about these two men, you wrote about-mile-an-hour you can do and akin. you said they lost because they each made the mistake of trying to explain an increasingly common
. it is a plan to make sure this country is a global leader in research and technology and clean energy, which will attract new companies and high-wage jobs for america. it is a plan put americans back to work, including veterans, rebuilding our infrastructure, and it is a plan to reduce our deficit in a balanced and responsible way. our work is made that much more urgent because at the end of this year we face a series of deadlines that require us to make major decisions about how to pay our deficit down, decisions that will have a huge impact on economies and the middle class, both now and in the future. last year i worked with democrats and republicans to cut $1 trillion in spending that we could not afford. i intend to work with both parties to do more, and that includes making reforms that will bring down the cost of health care so we can strengthen the programs like medicaid and medicare for the long haul. but as i have said before, we cannot just cut our way to prosperity. if we are serious about reducing the deficit, we have to combine spending cuts with revenue, and that means asking
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